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Freedom of Movement Tour

On 23rd June 2016 the UK, or rather 52% of the UK, or rather 52% of the people who turned up to vote, voted to leave the EU in a non-binding referendum. We woke up that morning in total dismay and incredulity. We cried. We suddenly felt divided by our respective nationalities.

Freedom of Movement Tour

On 23rd June 2016 the UK voted to leave the EU in a non-binding referendum. We woke up that morning in total dismay. We cried. We suddenly felt divided by our respective nationalities. Here's what we decided to do next.

Why do women shy away from challenging careers?

Having been a very achieving and ambitious woman in my early career, my recent professional choices have not ceased to surprise me.

The 2018 Italian election: old faces, new parties, familiar uncertainty

Italy will return to the polls next week for what promises to be another controversial general election, with immigration and the state of the economy having been afforded a prominent place in the electoral campaign. 

Time for the British government to get real

It is eighteen months since the EU Referendum and a great deal has happened since then, but most of it has been removed from any sense of reality.

Catalonia reverberates to the cries of freedom

New Europeans said it at the time of the referendum in October, and it is worth repeating now: "We do not have a dog in the fight when it comes to the material issue of Catalonian indepedence."

Brexit: what can we do on a community level?

A reflection on New Europeans' event on Monday 27th November, 'Brexit - What You Can Do' looking towards positive responses and solutions regarding Brexit, including New Europeans' newest project to develop a network of people who can reach into their London communities with reliable information on Brexit. 

Parliamentary Briefing from New Europeans on #UnilateralGuaranteesNOW

The UK government has so far refused to guarantee the rights of EU27citizens in the UK unilaterally, preferring instead to treat these citizens as “tradable commodities” in the Brexit

Why leave at all?

Ever since the Referendum of June 2016, the Brexit ship has been taking on water. Everybody knows the key pledge - a Brexit government would shift £350m a week, supposedly saved from membership costs, into the NHS every year, was an invention.

From free movers to settled immigrants

The publication of the Brexit government’s plans for EU nationals in the UK and UK nationals in rEU has already attracted much derision for its most obvious deficiencies.
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