Brexit and EU academics in the UK – breaking up is hard to do

Author: Colin Talbot


You “should now make arrangements to leave” (Home Office)

“The UK’s University sector is one of our most valuable national assets” Professor Brian Cox, the University of Manchester academic and TV presenter, told me last week. Brian said that UK higher education “is a genuinely global industry generating billions of pounds in export earnings, one of the necessary foundations of our innovation-led economy and perhaps our strongest soft power asset; political and industrial leaders from all over the world were educated here in the UK.”

Which makes it all the more strange why the Government should be, accidentally or deliberately, undermining our Universities. Most of the commentary on Brexit will have on UK Universities has concentrated on issues of funding, research cooperation and students. Much less attention has been paid to what keeps Universities running – academic staff – and what Brexit will mean for the thirty-thousand plus EU academics in the UK. Here are some of their personal experiences and what it means for our Universities.

How this all started for me….

This all started for me when I arrived at a meeting a couple of weeks ago and noticed one of my academic colleagues was visibly distressed.

When I asked what was wrong they said they’d just had a very alarming letter from the Home Office. Having lived and worked here for more than two decades (they’re a national of another EU country) they decided to play it safe after the Brexit vote and apply for leave to remain. Big mistake.

What they got was a highly worrying, threatening, letter from the Home Office saying they had no right to be here and they should “now make arrangements to leave’”. The letter was obviously wrong – they had every right to be here under existing UK law – but that didn’t lessen the emotional impact for my colleague who’s whole future was suddenly potentially up-ended.

You “should now make arrangements to leave”

Like others I had seen similar stories in the press but this was much more ‘real’. I wondered how many other academics might be affected so I turned to ‘Twitter’ to ask and was amazed by the response. The tweet I posted asking for cases was retweeted – mostly by concerned academics – over a thousand times and was viewed over 150,000 times.

People started writing to me with cases and I started digging into the issue.

The first thing that struck me was the level of fear, anger, and disgust, and in some cases resignation, in the responses I got. You will have noticed I have disguised individual cases – that’s because few people are willing to speak out, such is the level of fear about what might happen after Brexit.

Impact on Individuals

Some EU academics (along with others) who have been living and working quite happily and legally in the UK for years decided, after the June 23rd result, that they should try to cement their position by applying for one or other of the various routes to permanent residency.

The procedures are daunting and of Kafkaesque complexity – one form runs to 85 pages and requires forms of proof that make acquiring catholic sainthood look simple. As a result many applications are failing – but it is the form of the rejection that is causing much concern. A typical letter from the Home Office says (in part):

“As you appear to have no alternative basis of stay in the United kingdom you should now make arrangements to leave. If you fail to make a voluntary departure a separate decision may be made at a later date to enforce your removal…”

This seems to be a fairly typical ‘prepare to leave’ letter, variations on which have been sent to “failed” applicants – even though they are currently here perfectly legally.

Even more worryingly, the acceptance or rejection of these applications is based on the “Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 and regulation 26 of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006” to quote the letter again. Even you succeed, all of this will be repealed in the “Great Repeal Bill” proposed by the Government, which could rescind any ‘right to remain’ granted under existing law and regulations.

Brian Cox sums up the situation very well when he told me “we have spent decades – centuries arguably – building a welcoming and open atmosphere in our Universities and, crucially, presenting that image to an increasingly competitive world. We’ve been spectacularly successful; many of the worlds finest researchers and teachers have made the UK their home, in good faith. A few careless words have already damaged our carefully cultivated international reputation, however. I know of few, if any, international academics, from within or outside the EU, who are more comfortable in our country now than they were pre-referendum. This is a recipe for disaster.”

Another academic colleague said “as an academic I’m embarrassed and ashamed of UK Governments stance on EU citizens”.”

One academic told me “the Home Office is hedging its bets because we non-UK [academics] are now effectively hostages …”. A neuro-scientist from the EU at a top UK university reacted with defiance: “for what is worth, I refuse to apply for a piece of paper [leave to remain] that I don’t need and won’t be valid after Brexit – when current law says I don’t need it. It’s just a certificate. They can stick their 85-page form up their arses.”

The level of anxiety is obvious “I’m about to submit my permanent residency application. Any pointers from the rejections you’ve seen so far? Scary times ahead…”. Another said “as an Irish citizen I am assuming the Ireland Act will continue to provide my right to be here. But… “

A policy specialist from Oxford said “people have been turned down for administrative reasons alone. The Home Office looks for any reason to say ‘no’ at the moment.” Or as another, retired, academic put it, this is just “inhuman bureaucracy” at work.

There is also some ‘gallows humor’ about – one EU academic quipped “oh, we’ll just have to apply for asylum, I guess?”

How representative is all this? A recent survey of academics conducted by YouGov for the University and College Union (UCU) found that an overwhelming majority (90%) said Brexit will have a negative impact on UK higher education. Three-quarters (76%) of non-UK EU academics said they were more likely to consider leaving UK higher education. So even if they are not forced to leave, many probably will anyway.

A third (29%) said they already know of academics leaving the UK, and over two-fifths (44%) said they know of academics who have lost access to research funding as a direct result of Brexit.

Impact on Universities

UK Universities are heavily dependent on academics from the EU.

To cater for our global audience we need to attract the brightest and best and Europe is, unsurprisingly, a major source for such talent. Over 31,000 UK University academics come from the EU – sixteen percent of the total (all figures calculated from the Higher Education Statistics Agency data for 2014/15).

But this national figure underestimates just how important EU academics are to our top, global, Universities. The London School of Economics has 38% EU academic staff. Other prominent London Colleges – Imperial, King’s, University College London – have between a quarter and nearly a third. Oxford has 24% and Cambridge 22%. My own University, Manchester has 18% and most of the Russell Group of ‘research universities’ are in the top ranks of EU academic staff employers.

The LSE’s Interim Director, Professor Julia Black, commented: “LSE is one of the UK’s most global and internationally-renowned universities. The School’s diverse academic community is vital to our success and something of which we are very proud.

The UK’s higher education sector is currently envied across the world, but we fear Brexit poses a very real threat to our capacity to maintain our global standing.  If we make it more difficult for non-British staff and their families to work in the UK, more difficult to attract research funding, or more difficult to collaborate with international partners we could see a situation where more world-leading academics and researchers choose to work in competitor countries such as the US, Canada, Australia, or in other European countries.

The research and ideas our academics generate tackle the world’s most pressing challenges – from climate change to global health to extreme inequality.  In order to be able to continue this important work, we must be allowed to recruit and retain the very best academic staff from around the world.“

EU academics are equally important in the core subject areas that are vital to our long-term economic health. So areas like physics (26%), chemical engineering (25%), biosciences (22%), chemistry (21%) and IT (20%) are all heavily reliant on European talent.

So What?

Our global status isn’t of course just dependent on EU academics – UK experts are our bedrock (70%) – but the other 30% that come from the EU and the rest of the world are an important part of our global status.

Losing this talent – whether through demoralization or deliberate design – would have catastrophic effects. As Brian Cox puts it “Ministers must consider our global reputation before uttering platitudinous sound-bites for domestic consumption, and think much more carefully about how to ensure that the UK remains the best place in the world to educate and to be educated. [UK Universities] are everything the government claims it wants our country to become; a model for a global future.” He added “the current rhetoric is the absolute opposite of what is required. The UK appears, from outside, to be increasingly unwelcoming and backward looking”.” They should be even more careful about the policies they enact and the way they are implemented.

The Home Office’s at best clumsy, at worse malicious, handling of residency claims is causing huge distress and damage to our reputation. I am already hearing cases of EU nationals leaving, or planning to leave, because of the uncertain and unwelcoming future they now face. One academic lawyer I know of has already moved. We don’t know what the eventual outcome will be and how many EU academics we’ll lose now, or in the future, as a result of all this.

This article originally appeared on both the LSE Brexit Blog and on Professor Talbot's own blog. It is reproduce here with his kind permission.

 

 


Colin Talbot

About the Author

Colin Talbot

Colin is the current Professor of Government in Politics at the School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester. His main area of expertise is public services and public management reform. He has completed major international comparative studies on the creation of arms-length agencies (for the UK government and ESRC); of the use of performance reporting systems (for the National Audit Office); and of budget participation and scrutiny systems (for the Scottish Parliament). Colin has advised Parliamentary Committees on performance and public spending issues for the Treasury, Public Administration and Welsh Affairs Committees.

He is currently looking at the interface between academia and policymaking through a series of studies and experimental virtual "Policy Labs".

Colin has had an unconventional career - he left school at 16 and worked in various jobs before going to Manchester University as an undergraduate at 21. After Manchester he worked in a variety of mainly public sector posts before completing an MSc in Public Sector Management at Southbank University (with Distinction) and then becoming a senior lecturer in 1990 at Southbank. He completed a PhD at the London School of Economics before becoming Chair of Public Policy and Management at Glamorgan University in 1995 and Chair of Public Policy at Nottingham in 2003 and first as Chair of Public Policy and Management at Manchester Business School and most recently professor of Government in Politics | Social Scinces. He maintains a blog about Brexit, academia, public policy and other issues.

View all articles
Colin Talbot

About the Author

Colin Talbot

Colin is the current Professor of Government in Politics at the School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester. His main area of expertise is public services and public management reform. He has completed major international comparative studies on the creation of arms-length agencies (for the UK government and ESRC); of the use of performance reporting systems (for the National Audit Office); and of budget participation and scrutiny systems (for the Scottish Parliament). Colin has advised Parliamentary Committees on performance and public spending issues for the Treasury, Public Administration and Welsh Affairs Committees.

He is currently looking at the interface between academia and policymaking through a series of studies and experimental virtual "Policy Labs".

Colin has had an unconventional career - he left school at 16 and worked in various jobs before going to Manchester University as an undergraduate at 21. After Manchester he worked in a variety of mainly public sector posts before completing an MSc in Public Sector Management at Southbank University (with Distinction) and then becoming a senior lecturer in 1990 at Southbank. He completed a PhD at the London School of Economics before becoming Chair of Public Policy and Management at Glamorgan University in 1995 and Chair of Public Policy at Nottingham in 2003 and first as Chair of Public Policy and Management at Manchester Business School and most recently professor of Government in Politics | Social Scinces. He maintains a blog about Brexit, academia, public policy and other issues.

View all articles
Close

Subscribe to email updates from New Europeans

Join our newsletter to receive the latest news and events from New Europeans.

* indicates required

Or be a part of it!

Join today Donate Volunteer